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washington was writing romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. her name was sally terry fairfax, very attractive, older, sophisticated woman. what if washington letters have become public during the french and indian war or the revolutionary war? but just petraeus' e-mails became public and what if we got rid of george washington? bill clinton is not the first and not the worst in petraeus is not the first for the worse. in there ,-com,-com ma done that and there's a long history in infected pains me to say that even abraham lincoln visited a prostitute. i know, say it isn't so, right? but it happened. the details are sketchy and there's not a lot of letters written about this but here is what we can piece together. lincoln's best friend was joshua. >> speed and speed was as dashing and handsome and quote unquote lucky with the ladies as lincoln was unlucky and awkward and romance. speed felt sorry for lincoln in the eyes called each other by their last names, speed them again and speed invited lincoln to work in his general store and he didn't have a place to say so he
that the u.s. secretary of state contracted a stomach virus that left her severely dehydrated. on her return home, she collapsed and severed a concussion. during a follow-up examination, doctors have discovered a blood clot. mrs. clinton is being kept under observation in this bill york hospital, receiving medication, and will remain here for the next 48 hours at least. she has been offered for the past three weeks. her illness prevented her from testifying before congress about the attack on u.s. diplomatic mission in benghazi. that killed the ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans. the department faced severe criticism. mrs. clinton who is the most traveled secretary of state in u.s. history is due to step down in the new year. many democrats want her to run for the presidency in 2016. her health is likely to be a major factory in making any decision. >> concerned about the health of the venezuelan president hugo chÁvez, suffering of further complications after cancer surgery in cuba. a television address, the vice president said mr. chÁvez's helped remains delicate. >>
and that's where the criminals have a field day. >> how many guns did mrs. lanza have in her home? >> i don't know how many she had. that's not really the point. >> she had six guns, including four assault rifles, what happened her deranged son -- >> her evil son. her evil son. >> it doesn't matter what you call him. >> well, i think it matters, if you believe and understand that there is evil in the world, don't you don't try as your first line of defense to solve it psychiatrically. you protect yourself with a gun. >> let me finish my thread then, mr. pratt. so you have an evil young man who is living at home, clearly with serious troubles. and his mother has six firearms in that house. including the weapons that he used to murder 26 people, including 20 children, age 5. you are quite happy about that situation, are you? and you would be quite happy if there are many more people in his position, in homes around america, where there are that number of firearms which could be used by mentally unstable people? >> americans with firearms in their homes typically have them locked in a safe. as
marion for a third time. mrs. alexander did know about that when i told her she said she wasn't surprised that her grandfather said that he was the jim dandy and that characterization in her mind went along with this idea that at 71 he would marry for a third time. she told me the family story of how he learned to read and write. he learned in the presence of the little master or the white boy. this might well have been dolley's son payne todd who would be the object of the instruction and jennings would be standing to the side but listening and absorbing and learning. in the book i presented perhaps the first instance of jennings taking advantage of his position. he was the good listener and a good network. there are so many places he was associated with that are extent in washington today. one of them is not his own house. his own house located where else street and 18 intercept. some of you may remember until very recently was border's books and i would go there and i would go into the cafe. i was sitting in my coffee thinking i could be at paul jennings's kitchen table right now and u
of the united states senate, i will present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband. our gift to her because he gave so many gifts to us. he was a lion in the senate, a real american hero. though gentle in style, he was a fierce warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. when he received his medal of honor, he was rising to the call of the sirens at pearl harbor, volunteering to serve his country, putting aside his own dreams to be a physician. but he went on to be a healer of many wounds. he was decorated in world war ii for saving his fellow soldiers. my experience with senator inouye as a friend was that he was a devoted, dedicated public servant. he was hawaii's first representative of the nation's newest state. he was the first person of japanese heritage ever to be elected to the senate. imagine. he himself knew what it was like to break barriers and to break boundaries. when he came to the senate, he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. he fought tirelessly to improve their lives. now his style was one of absolute civility. he was the
the wife--his wife found out. in one of her diaries, it says, one day, 'spoke to p. about mrs. r.,' and that's the last mention of mrs. r. in mrs. morgan's diaries. so i think that was a fairly dramatic moment. he then had to kind of keep it more secret, and he was not--it's interesting, he was--he lived very--he was much more of a european than an american puritan about all this. the european aristocrats had mistresses. they would travel to other friends' country houses, they would stay in european hotels. they trusted their friends not to talk. it was sort of accepted, especially in the prince of wales' set. he had these women with him, he traveled, and everybody knew about it, and nobody really talked about it. and i think morgan sort of did more or less the same thing. but once his wife found out, it was a problem. and the other problem was that this mrs. randolph was relatively young and not wealthy and she needed a husband, and morgan was not going to get divorced. so a rather convenient solution came along. another prominent american man of their world was william c. whitn
of 18 pay. -- 35 he is egger to win a conviction. by this time mrs. thorton is going forward and come to the defense of her alleged assail i can't and says in the trial at arthur never lifted the ax she never believed he intended to hurt her she felt safe in his presence. he was just -- and she wanted the it to go away. and he did this and this and managed to get ore people to override the testimony. so arthur is convicted. there's only one punishment for that which is the death penalty. and so arthur bowen goes on to death row, and? january of 1836, is sentenced to death. and with the clock ticking, mrs. thorton does something even more -- it was amazing snuff enough she had testified on arthur's behalf on criminal trial. she starts out recruiting her friends in high society and she was very prominent woman. many prominent friend, easy access to the leadership of the country. she weptd to the vice president van buren and said use your good officings with the president jackson, tell him he should pardon arthur, you know. his mother is very good and, you know, she
pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: mr. speaker, i have no additional speakers but i'll continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlelady from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i want to thank the gentleman from utah for his work on this bill, and i particularly want to thank the chairman of the full committee, mr. issa, who went to great lengths to make sure that this bill in fact made the agenda of the conference and who has been so important to understanding and making sure that particularly minor bills like this receive quick treatment. i must say in addition to his work on very, very important bills for the district of columbia that are still in progress, like our budget autonomy bill. with that, mr. speaker, i have no further speakers, and i yield the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: mr. speaker, we urge passage and i yield back. the speaker pro temp
to close. mr. sessions: i thank the gentlewoman for asking. i have no further speakers and would allow her that opportunity and then i will close. ms. aughter: thank you very much. mr. speaker, we should be doing one thing today and that's passing the continuation of tax cuts for the middle class. the american people couldn't be more united in this support for tax cut and there is no reason for delay. the senate has already passed the bill and we can take up now, it's here at the desk. members across the aisle agree, that we must not let ose middle class taxes go up. with such common ground why would the majority waste another minute before ensuring that the taxes will not go up on the middle class? the answer isn't clear to me. i can't fathom it. but if the majority won't take action, we will. mr. speaker, if we defeat the previous question, i'm going to offer an amendment to the rule that says two things. one, first we will pass the bill to extend the middle class tax t. and second, that we will pass legislation that will avoid the fiscal cliff and the chaos that would ensue. and i ask u
company and says mr. jefferson nine sorry i'm late. and her head explodes because this is supposed to be the embodiment of everything that is wrong in american life, and she just found him to be the most gracious man she had ever met. he could disarm you that way. there is something poetic and the fact that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone is going to tell him who voted. maybe he is already starting on the next one. but i want to talk a little bit -- jefferson the politician, jefferson the renaissance man, jefferson the symbol, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, franklin roosevelt wanted him for the new deal and world war ii, he's like winston churchill in the bible he can be used in any way that you need partly because he was so articulate and so proliferate. 20,000 or more letters. brilliantly written, wonderfully eloquent. so what can we make of it? this is the man, the human being we have, and that's what i always wa
is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this legislation, ms. ros-lehtinen, for her leadership on this issue and her work in addressing the north korean threat. earlier this month, north korea carried out a missile launch using ballistic missile technology in correct defiance of the international community this important resolution condemns their launch, calls on the north korea to live up to its commitments, admere to its international obligations and deal piecefully with its neighbors. this is a blatant violation of the u.n. security council resolutions. 1718 and 1874. we urge the security council to take strong and concerted action to demonstrate that pyongyang's actions are completely unacceptable. in familiar -- in particular we call on china and russia to work construct ily with other members of the council to show that the international community is united in condemning north korea's provocative behavior. north korea is only further isolating itself with its irresponsible action and the development of ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons will never bring the
agree with her completely, mr. speaker. it's very important that we not let the sequester take place and i hope and believe that she is right, that we will not see that happen. and number two, i'd like to associate myself with her remarks as it relates to ensuring that we do not go over the fiscal cliff. that's something that is very, very desired on our part as well. i'd also like to respond to just one point very quickly, mr. speaker, before i yield to my good friend from roseville, and say that i can provide my friend from rochester, our distinguished ranking member of the rules committee, assurance that we will not be adjourning the congress today and ending our work. i have said, i said in the rules committee, mr. speaker, that we are going to continue with our work. the action that we're going to take as it relates to these two measures, again, the reconciliation package, which is designed to ensure that, as my friend from rochester has said, that we don't see sequestration which we all know would be devastating, take effect, it is a package of $238 billion over a 10-year perio
. just let's get started. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i think the gentlelady. i also think her for 15 years. we talked about having union station is a true intermodal center. we used to have our people come to the greyhound station to three plot, drag their luggage to union station. we used to go around town to take a bus with satellite location. ms. norton was with me and in 15 minutes we got it done, dedicated, came up for that jury in a very heated election. they thank you for your leadership. not the secretary come but the deputy secretary was instrumental in making nation's capital headteacher intermodal center. i think both of you. ms. edwards. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank all of our witnesses today and particularly thank secretary lahood. i understand it's your birthday. i don't think i would've chosen to spend my birthday with you, but i'm glad you've chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion today about high-speed rail. we had a chance to begin a half ago to go up to new york and less amtrak, but
congress. i yield to the gentleman from louisiana. mr. scalise: i thank the gentlelady for her leadership, not only for hosting this hour but for being so passionate about the need to control spending, and the need to get the economy back on track. she was talking about about solutions to avert the fiscal cliff. if if you look at how we got here, nothing gets resolved out of washington, it's an abyss that doesn't need to happen. if you just go back and look at the promises made by poth because massachusetts when he was running for office, when he was running for re-election, he talked about working across the aisle he talked about bipartisan solutions he talked about it a lot and the american people expected that the president would keep that promise. but before the ink was even dry, before some of the states had confirmed and finalized their vote totals for this last election, the president comes out with a hyper partisan solution that's his approach. when the president comes out with his plan to raise taxes on some, not renew ores, to threaten middle class families with a tax increase i
thought perhaps it was because mrs. reagan needed time too consult her astrologer and decide if it was an auspicious moment for such a trip. jeff. >> thank you. it leads you to wonder. there's no indication that progress is being made behind the scenes. >> you'd like to hope. >> one would hope, right. >>> the atlanta braves haven't used their screaming indian logo since the reagan years, but the controversial logo will be brought back next season as part of the team's new batting practice hats. they started using the screaming indian in 1984. they stopped because of the fwraups offended of that on sports uniforms. >>> experts say that more than half the ones available now are fake. elvis presley tops this year's list of the most forged celebrity signatures. last time we checked he hadn't signed a signature in a while. he's followed by the beatles, first man on the moon, armstrong, and people are still forge kennedy's autograph. >> there's no faking this. here are the most annoying words of 2012. this one, jeff? >> amazing? would that be in there? >> we'll see. for the fourth
passion, i hope that her passion for social justice is an inspiration to all of us. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from maryland seek recognition? mr. cummings: to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman ask for unanimous consent? mr. cummings: yes. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. cummings: thank you very much. today i'm incredibly pleased to congratulate my dear colleague for her aessential to the chair of the senate appropriations committee. the senator's commitment to our great state is undeniable. she has worked tirelessly throughout her prestigious career to serve her fellow marylanders first as a social worker and now as one of the most influential members of the united states senate. the senator is a leader that maryland and truly our nation can be proud of. she was the first woman elected to the senate who was not preceded by her husband or father and has continued breaking barriers ever since. t
again. may i say, mr. speaker, what a pity. not to see the honorable member -- [inaudible] in her place. but from the jungle she may not have succeeded in talking for the nation on many things, but she did speak for the nation when he called the prime minister and the chancellor two arrogant -- [inaudible] [cheers and applause] mr. speaker, no wonder, no wonder this prime minister keeps on losing his temper, mr. speaker. because his worst nightmare is coming true. not snakes and spiders in the jungle, but their fiscal rule broken, their economic credibility in tatters, exposed now as incompetent and unfair. yes, mr. speaker, he's the chancellor. can't someone get him out of here? [cheers and applause] mr. speaker -- [inaudible] revised up, the fiscal rules broken on every target they set themselves failing, failing, failing, cutting the nhs and not the deficit over 212 billion pounds more borrowing than they promised two years ago, cutting taxes for the rich while struggling families and pensioners pay the price. unfair, incompetent and completely out of touch! [cheers and applause] >>
with mrs. clinton for a chat about her future. >> what most people are asking now about you is, will you consider running for president in 2016? would you just like to make your declaration now and we can conclude this interview. >> that would be fascinating to me, as well as everyone else. i've said i really don't believe that that's something i will do again. i am so grateful i had the experience of doing it before. but i think there are lots of ways to serve. so i will continue to serve. >> what would it take to convince you to run in 2016? >> that's all hypothetical, because right now i have no intention of running. >> we also wondered after four years at her post as secretary of state, what keeps her up at night? what worries you the most? >> iran. iran worries me the most. because it's not only the terrible prospect that they might have a nuclear weapon, they're already engaging in terrorism all over the world, directly through their own agents, using others like hezbollah. >> what about here? could they attack us here? >> well, remember, they had a plot to murder the saudi ambassa
-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from that sexual assault that night in 1985 was not tested for 20 years. it sat on the shelf in a crime lab somewhere in dallas, texas, because the dallas police department had a new incentive to go and look at those old cases, this case was looked at. that evidence was tested and the dallas police department decided that kevin glenn turner committed this crime back in 1985. but that was 20 years ago. the statute of limitations had run and justice could not occur and lavenia's case, because the system waited too long to find t
to change. jody canter wrote this in "the new york times," mrs. clinton may find that her freedom comes with one huge constraint. the more serious she is about 2016, the less she can do, no frank, seen it all memoir, no clients, commissions or controversial positions that could prove problematic. now, i'm one of the so called smart guys that david was talking about. i think she is going to run. i think she wants to be the first woman president of the united states. she's going to have to be cautious in what she does over the next year or two. >> any candidate has to be cautious. >> well, if she's never going to run for office again, she doesn't have to be cautious. >> she's well known. people know her across the board. there are a sizable number of republicans who like her. the reason why people like her is because they know she's a principled person. somebody who believes in human rights. equality of all people. she'd make a terrific president of the united states. i don't think she has to be confined by those limitations miss canter wrote in her article. >> the problems we face in 201
." because she was in her doughnut hole. well, a couple weeks later, mrs. johnson would be back in the hospital. how wasteful is that? how -- why? why is that -- that costs a tremendous amount of money to our system. this is saving money. this is health care reform. this is medicare reform. it's improving people's health and saving money at the same time. so we have increased benefits, we've extended the life of medicare. that was done as part of health care reform. that is medicare reform. now, in the election, we had a discussion about this. there were a lot of ads about it. we know what governor romney would have done to medicare. he said very explicitly that -- and, again, the presiding officer has quoted this. he said very explicitly he would restore those billions and billions of dollars in overpayments to private insurance companies for no reason, for no good effect, just so that i guess these insurance companies could have more profit. instead, we reinvested this money into medicare. but he would have given it to the insurance companies. he would have replaced the health
it did not result in a stroke or neurolog call daniel. the clot is treated with the blood thinners. her doctors are predicting a full recovery. >> good news about former president george w. bush. the spokesman for mr. bush says he has been moved from the intensive care unit to a regular patient room at the methodist hospital in houston. the 88-year-old former president is recovering with illness that begone bronchitis related cough. >>> navy also deployed domestically made hovercraft in the operation today. >>> later on, you are aware of a legal limit for drinking before driving. now officials have to consider legal limits for smoking pot before getting behind the wheel. up next, if unions are in decline, how is it that a doc strike has potential to daniel the u.s. economy? -- damage the u.s. economy? since i've lost weight i have so much more energy than i used to, when i'm out with my kids, my daughter's like, "mom, wait up!" and i'm thinking, "shouldn't you have more energy than me? you're, like, eight!" [ male announcer ] for every 2 pounds you lose through diet and exercise alli ca
she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would go home and it was a completely untraditional lifestyle as farm laborers, my brother and myself. my sisters had a different experience. ultimately that was what we knew and what we understood about our environment. >> within the family, what were some of the dynamics? >> my father was latin -- mexico-american. my mother was european-american so that kind of created a very tense -- sort of other complicated household,
describe how his eyes were. he was charming and gracious and funny and witty and totally beguiling. and her husband, who was the head of the national intelligence, comes in and says, oh, mr. jefferson, i'm sorry i'm late. and margaret bayard smith's head explodes because she just found him to be the most gracious man she'd ever metment -- met. he could disarm you that way. there is something poetic in the fact that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone's going to tell him we voted. maybe he's already starting on the next one. i want to talk a little bit, we -- jefferson, the politician, jefferson, the renaissance man, jeff the symbol -- jefferson, the symbol, you know, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, frank lib roosevelt -- franklin roosevelt wanted him in the runup to world war ii. he can be used in any way you need partly because he was so articulate and so prolific. 20,000 or more letters, brilliantly written, wonderfully eloquen
: the leader. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the call of the quorum be terminated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, i rise today to honor a woman by the name of janice shelton. for her friendship, and 32 years of dedication as an employee of this body, the united states senate. 25 of those years janice worked as my executive assistant. she's demonstrated a sincere dedication to me, my office, my family, and this body, the united states senate. it's an understatement to say that she will be sorely missed. she will be. she's always been kind and thoughtful to me, to my wife landra, all my children, and to everyone that she comes in contact. if there's a problem, everyone knows, go to janice. no one has my ear the past 25 years like janice shelton has. she has been a professional career creating order where there could easily be chaos. over the course of her productive career with the army, the white house, and the senate, have been each -- each benefited from her unique expertise and professionalism and hard work. she began her professional life at the dep
there is a tendency to form that blood clot. >> in the case of mrs. clinton we know that during an earlier illness she became light-headed, fainted and then hit her head and cuncussed. could it be a side effect of the concussion. >> concussion in adults it is not a known cause of venous signus thrombosis. in children sometimes it makes them sus-- susceptible. and given it is an uncommon condition, five in a million it is not a common condition at all. so i doubt it was directly related to concussion because in general, it is not known to be caused by that. but among possible causes, again, you are allowed it to speculate, it would be ruled out some of them like pregnancy or if there is any tendency of a blood disorder, a tendency to hypercoagulate,. >> suarez: so what do we do in treatment? and is it a long course of treatment? >> yes and no. if there is, for example n someone pregnant or just gave birth and maybe has thrombosis, about three to six months of anti-coagulation or using blood thinners would be enough. if there is no particular cause, the range from 6 to 12 months. and there are condition
of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanisms, maritime energy disputes, not only in the united states and eastern mediterranean, our pick is coming up. with
? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. mr. cardin: let me thank senator shaheen for her leadership on this issue. we've had many discussions about how to advance human rights issues and what is the best strategy to get the sergei magnitsky bill enacted into law. your leadership on the senate foreign relations committee on europe, your leadership in the helsinki commission, you've been one of the real champions on this issue. i just want to thank you, want to thank you for your good advice and for allowing us to be able to get us to this day. i'm convinced tomorrow the senate will pass this legislation. the president is going to sign it, and we will have achieved a great victory for human rights. i thank you. i think also your observations as we were talking about how to move forward with this bill in connection with pntr for russia and as senator lieberman talked about a little bit earlier, i am convinced as important as this bill was, that the magnitsky bill by itself would have been extremely difficult for us to get through for the president and for the president to sign and to b
and be reckoned as. [applause] now we would like to return to her speaker for a traditional city club question and answer. we welcome questions for my phone, putting guests. holding the microphone today is kerry miller. we have our first question please. >> mr. brousard commie talk about complexities facing the average american patient. certainly insurance exchanges in the next year or so will make it more complex. [inaudible] in the drafting of the affordable care act. why didn't humana and the others try to copy the systems of canada and other parts of europe like having a single-payer take care of all medical expenses? 's been a good question. we could probably be here quite some time to answer. from our vantage point, what we see if this is somehow works in canada and it does not have the care level here in the united states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can acces
scoring partisan political points. it is her character that has made the difference. mr. president, the private acts of public figures can tell you a lot about their character. i want to share my colleagues this morning a story about olympia snowe that i witnessed personally. there was a republican fund- raiser going on one night and i was arriving late driving in a car. people weren't streaming out of the fund-raiser and each of them was passing by a man who was on crutches with only one leg, clearly destitute, clearly down on his luck, but the was asking for money. everybody but olympia snowe passing by without a word as if he were invisible. olympia went over to this destitute man on crutches with one leg and she not only handed him some money, but she took the time to talk to him. i think that tells you so much about who olympia snowe is. her kindness to this individual when everyone else was passing by. the kindness when no one was watching. her kindness to him was a private act that told all lost -- al of us so much about our character. it with her retirement from the senate,
,", which, you know, was profittedly based on anna wintour. your thoughts on that, mr. ambassador. >> how do you know she's not going to be the next secretary of state? why limit her to a mere ambassadorship? it wouldn't surprise me. it has been historically the case that large contributors to presidential campaigns get appointed -- megyn: and she's one of the top ten bundlers for president obama. >> and i have to tell you, i've had wide experience with political appointees -- true, mostly republicans -- and they've been very effective. i would not underestimate how important it is overseas to have somebody who knows the president personally, who could call the president if they needed to. and here's the really important thing, who cares first and foremost about the president's policy. not about what the bureaucracy at the state department wants, but about the president's policy. i'm not saying anna wintour's going to do all that -- megyn: right. >> but that is important. megyn: what does that person do? if you become the boord to the u.k., what do you do? >> well, that is one of the hardest
know her term as close up as well as mr. cook because they have been incredible part rose to this agency. we jointly put in place definition rules as the congress asked us to do and we've jointly address public reporting of hedge funds. we were not asked by the congress or required to be joined but we have to harmonize where we can but it's different in timing to read these completed a lot 80%, and robert can tell you and mr. cook can tell you their percentage but it's partly because that's all we really do. we have received futures and swaps, and they have a lot more to oversee. >> we can allow him to characterize and we have a bunch more questions. >> i would agree there's been good coordination in terms of sharing documents. >> timing wise we are in a very different place. estimate 5% of the market i think the other thing is that the proposal stage there's been a lot of similarities. there have been some differences. sometimes the differences reflect differences in products and sometimes reflect a difference in approach and i think that is appropriate for people to thin
. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. every debate is not the question. the question is a good piece of paper decided to marriage. a question of and equality. i have this friend and her parents got together about 20 years now. one of them is great at cooking and awful at directions. the couple followed by cnn ryan aren't allowed to get married. the official definition is formal union of a man and a woman, physically recognized by law which they become husband-and-wife. but. but why today's society, and accepting society sisto richart between men and women? people have partnerships and are not allowed to be asserted as has been our wife and although marriage isn't for everyone, shouldn't it be something everyone can decide to? how could she feel if you couldn't bear the person you love? the first is not driven in 2001 in the last, argentina 2010. 10 countries in 11 years isn't that exciting. love is the natural human emotion. why should the of the person you love change anything? why should we let authority to take her society can and can't get married? we as a society have a moral an
-up exam they say was related to her concussion. the state department says clinton suffered that concussion earlier this month. the location of the clot has not yet been disclosed to us. doctors are closely monitoring mrs. clinton. cnn's jill dougherty is live in our washington bureau. jill, you and i have been talking closely this morning, but have you learned any more about her condition or anything from her doctors? >> reporter: no, we've been asking, but so far no updates. the state department had a statement sunday night. we're hoping we'll get something new. at this point, it would appear they're really just watching very carefully to see how those anti- anti-coagulants, what kind of effect they have on her. it's been a rough couple of weeks, first the flu, and then the concussion, and now this. it's especially worrisome when you have a secretary of state who's traveled now almost 1 million miles by air, and they've put that on hold, any type of travel on hold for at least another couple of weeks. right now i can't imagine that she is going to be doing much of anything travel-wise. th
involved in the manufacturing of water heaters. i thank the chairman again. i thank mr. aderholt and i also want to commend the gentleman and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from kentucky reserves. the gentleman from california continues to reserve. the gentlelady from kentucky is recognized. mr. whitfield: mr. speaker, at this time i would like to recognize for a period of three minutes dr. roe of tennessee who's a member of the education committee, for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for three minutes. mr. roe: i thank the gentleman, the chairman, for yielding, and, mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 6582. this legislation would establish a uniform energy efficient descripter for all water heaters, walk-in freezers and walk-in coolers. the legislation also improves the testing methods that determine whether or not these products are energy efficient which will provide certainty for manufacturers and their products. in my hometown is o
of italy and says mr. monti should stay out of politics. kelly? >> carolin roth from milamilan. that wasn't her voice, that was the audio. >> i don't know about him staying out of politics. don't see that happening. >> clearly not. >>> still to come, we'll talk to the global ceo of sanrio. the owner of the iconic character hello kitty about the outlook for holiday spending. ♪ any tree on this lot is on me. i'm the messenger, by the way. what's your name? joanne. with the hundreds that i save with progressive on my car insurance, this tree is on me. no way. way. this tree is on me. really?! yes. aah! let me just trim it up a little bit for you. [ buzzing ] thank you. saving's greetings. you guys are gonna get this tree right here? are you sure that's the one? i'll tie it to the roof for you. make savings a new holiday tradition. ♪ look this isn't my first christmas. these deals all seem great at the time... but later... [ shirt ] merry christmas, everybody! not so much. ho ho ho! this isn't that kind of deal. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at
. i join with the entire senate family in wishing her and john the very best in the years ahead. mr. president, in these closing days of the 112th congress, the senate is saying farewell to again one of our most popular and respected members, senator jeff bingaman of new mexico. when jeff came to this body 30 years ago, he had already led a life of accomplishment created in small-town new mexico, silver city. he was an eagle scout, graduated from harvard college, stanford law school, where he met his future wife, ann. while at stanford, he worked in senator robert f. kennedy's campaign for president. at the age of 35, he was elected new mexico attorney general in 1978. and four years later at the age of 39, elected to the united states senate. during his three decades in this body, jeff bingaman has been a classic workhorse senator as opposed to being a show horse senator. he is truly remarkable and distinctive among senators for his willingness to shun the limelight and share the credit in order to get important things done for his state and for this country. senator bingaman has b
in a deal to gentlelady who has her notes all they are. they'd drove for five minutes. >> well, thank you so much, mr. chairman and i just think this is an outstanding panel. i guess i want to say that mr. giancarlo's comment about mr. gensler preferring the futures market over the swaps market because of this jurisdiction, i guess i find that rather provocative and i'll let him respond a little bit. i was more curious about what mr. parsons thought about mr. giancarlo's comment that this really creates a lot of regulatory arbitrage and unintended consequences as an economist. at like you to comment on that testimony. >> it's a very important problem in the cf to see us kind of between a rock and a hard place for two reasons. if you're talking about customized swaps, does it really different from futures and can only be dealt with in the otc swaps markets. for example, all these energy swaps that moved from swaps into futures, those are not customized. those are standardized instrument. they are treat on exchange effectively. they are clearer. this legacy to a standardized swaps and if you r
. at 9 p.m. eastern "after words" with cynthia lowen. she talks about her book, "bully," an action plan to combat the bullying crisis. and we conclude tonight's prime time coverage with john meacham. in his biography of thomas jefferson, mr. meacham reports despite mr. jefferson's strong beliefs, he was able to successfully lead the country in a highly partisan political environment. that all happens tonight on c-span2's booktv. >> and now patrick tyler talks about the influence that israeli military leaders have had in shaping israeli government policy since the country's founding. this is about an hour, 20 minutes. [background sounds] >> good afternoon. welcome to the new america foundation, i'm peter bergen. it's really my pleasure to introduce patrick tyler, a man who doesn't need introduction. he's author of multiple books on china, the middle east and most recently the excellent new book, "fortress israel," which is a really excellent account of the last several decades of the kind of israeli national security establishment and, obviously, of considerable interest right now given
, representative richmond. mr. richmond: i thank the gentlelady for yielding and commend her on her passion as a physician and someone who has taken an oath to preserve life and to make sure that people can live out their years in a meaningful way and die of natural causes. i'm from louisiana, which our motto is we're the supportman's paradise. we like to fish and hunt. we like to have a fishing pole and a gun. the guns we use and the guns that sportsmen use are rifles and you don't need high-capacity magazines in order to hunt deer, in order to hunt dove, duck, rabbit. you just don't do that. but i rise tonight in support of my colleagues, because especially in our urban cities, we are losing far too many of our children, fathers, mothers, sisters and brothers to gun violence. and every once in a while we will have an event that will shake the confidence of our country and make us take a step back and actually look at our gun laws in this country and say wait, we have done far too much and we have spended the second amendment too far. the founders of the constitution when the second amendm
and is testament to her strength and her spirit. the people of maine and america are grateful for her many years of service. i am grateful for her leadership and her friendship. and i know that olympia snowe will continue to influence national policy for many years to come. mr. president, we have a tradition in the senate of referring to our colleagues on the senate floor during debate as "my friend from this state" or "my friend from that state," and oftentimes the word "friend" really just means colleague. but there is a fellow senator whom i call friend in the truest sense of the word, and that person, mr. president, is the senior senator from connecticut, my dear friend, senator joe lieberman. when joe lieberman announced early last year that he would not seek reelection to the senate, he called himself a lucky guy for having had the opportunity to serve his state and his country. i would contend that it is we in this chamber and the people throughout connecticut and across our nation who are the ones who are truly fortunate, for joe lieberman's life long commitment to public service, includ
news. a mr. president duchess of cambridge resting now at kensington palace after being treated at the hospital. we're going to see her exit in just a moment. she was being treated for a severe form of morning sickness. we know you've heard a lot about that, but we wanted to talk about the road ahead as well as a few other health stories with an attending physician at winthrop university hospital, also british, so we thought that would make it even more appropriate, doctor. so what's ahead for kate now? >> well, she's very much going to be in the eyes of the media all over the world, so i'm sure that she'll be glad when this period of morning sickness passes. i mean, obviously, morning sickness is extremely common, but she's had an extremely severe form that required intravel now fluids and, hopefully, as her pregnancy progresses, the morning sickness will improve. jenna: anything as a doctor you'd be concerned about now? >> well, obviously, we worry about dehydration, but usually the baby's absolutely fine, so if the fluids are replaced, hopefully as that passes, all will be we
to basically figure his or her route properly. >> host: we are talking with andrew blum, the author of "tubes" the journey to the center of the internet and the staff wired -- staff writer at "wired" magazine. mr. blum you described a company as an internet backbone company. what is that? >> guest: they own very large physical pieces of the internet. they operate on a global network meaning, they have rights, strands of glass alongside a road or a railroad track and more importantly, they then owned this optical equipment that illuminates the fibers that transmit the data. and they sell that to anyone who is interested. it could be another network. it could be a large government organization and the government is level 3 major customer about what they are doing is essentially, they are the ones who are allowing the internet to the global. they're the ones making a long-distance the long-distance connections and they're the base layer that allows all of the other more familiar network names that everybody knows, the facebook's in the googles to write on top of that. >> host: andrew blum, if so
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